Responsible Storytelling

Storytelling is a powerful tool. Through stories, we are able to:

  • Identify patterns
  • Make connections
  • Become empowered
  • Learn ways to handle problems
  • Identify or eliminate suspects through who, what, and when
  • Experience satisfaction
  • Test ideas
  • Identify and understand the forces empacting us

Cognitive psychologists claim that stories are a fundamental part of intelligence and imagination.

Stories and storytelling are major tools for shaping thought. If we are going to use them as tools, we should do so responsibly. This requires consideration of our intended audience and a definition of our goal(s).

Think of how powerful video vignettes that include people’s stories are, especially if they are showcased with related memorabilia. These stories have the strength to wrestle with conflicting opinions or information. Politicians and advertisers have made great use of them. For example, what was your opinion of Tiger Wood’s lifestyle prior to the Thanksgiving weekend incident? Tiger Woods did not create that image because apparently he was living in a far different way than most people expected or imagined.

There are positive and educational ways to use storytelling. Stories are able to encourage problem solutions, best practices, and lessons learned. The best way for this to occur is through a storytelling session where someone shares one of their stories with the audience, then discussion and information sharing follows.

Educators are able to use storytelling for leaps of understanding. By sharing a story that enables listeners to grasp how something may change, storytelling adds knowledge gains. This builds credibility. Powerful emotions may be released leading to bonding among the audience. Not only this, story gives permission for the exploration of controversial or uncomfortable topics. Responsibility that recognizes the diversity of the population will tread cautiously here because point of view may be swayed and move some towards change. We would not want to be held accountable for creating conflict through the stories that are shared when it comes to the relationships of students and their parents.

On the upside, storytelling is able to create heroes. Sharing stories that provide examples of character-building behavior lifts the spirits. Again, think of your former knowledge concerning the story of Tiger Woods prior to the events that unfolded leading to the tarnishing of his image.

Case studies that are reviewed by students create opportunities for learning. Students are able to succeed by absorbing facts and theories as they review a real problem. The case study may be analyzed with the educator guiding the way. Synthesis of conflicting data may occur. Points of view may be examined. Whatever the case study places in front of the students gives time for seizing an opportunity.

Storytelling is a powerful tool that requires the educator to practice responsibility when using it. Goals should be set that recognize the diversity of students. When done appropriately, storytelling is able to offer an excellent vehicle through which learning may occur.

Using Storytelling with Students as the Tellers

The first reaction that I receive from teachers when I talk to them about storytelling is that they think of themselves as the storyteller or students retelling a story that is memorized. What if the stories told are by the students only and these stories are their stories? I am sure we can easily imagine our time with our students running rampant with stories that engage other students, but not necessarily how we desire for everyone to interact.

It would be much better is we set the stage by utilizing these ideas:

  • Stories relate to a sense of community. Since our students belong to the class community, they build relationships with each other. There is also a culture that exists in this community that reflects the students.
  • We can use stories to talk about life experience. Students have stories that come from the events of their lives. They are natural born storytellers, especially if given the opportunity to share what they know. When they retell their stories, they may discover new insights or possibilities.
  • If we want to use storytelling with students, we must set the parameters for the best possible outcomes for learning.  To begin we must be clear about what is expected of them as they explore a topic and find their relational stories. Asking a question that sets the tone and acts as a prompt is an excellent way to do this.
  • Reminding them how to listen to others as they listen to stories is important as well. They should not interrupt the storyteller. Also, they should not think about their story while listening to someone’s story. Finally, they should try to think of a title that they would like to give to the person’s story that they are listening to. Active listening is engagement and helps to maintain community and adds to the culture of the group.
  • Ask yourself, how much time do you have to devote or allow for the storytelling process to occur during your lesson. Should you break students up into large or small groups? Should students work with only a partner? Do you want students to share a few stories with all of the students when you come back together? If so, how will you determine which stories are told. Remember that adults are able to listen to about 4-5 stories in a row. For children, the number will be less.
  • Ideally, the storytelling will help students to process what they know. Schedule time for students to talk about the stories they hear. The conversations will help solidify the theme that is being examined. New learning will become more apparent through the discussion making it easier for students to identify what they are studying.
  • Selecting topics for storytelling are best chosen when they represent successes or joy. The goal here is to encourage students to think about what we want them to focus on. If sad or depressing stories are the focus, we may offer opportunities for students to not experience success.
  • Storytelling works well with topics that require the building of knowledge. When students engage in telling stories that lead to them seeing how the puzzle pieces fit together, an excitement of understanding may break out. Synergy can be created leading to better understanding of the topic.

When storytelling is combined with students who are telling about what they know and the topic that we are attempting to help students understand, the resulting stories may enrich the learning and the community to which the students belong. A larger view of the world is embraced. Relationships grow. Storytelling may be the key to success for some topics that we teach where we have not experienced that success before with students.

Look Who’s Telling Stories!

I found an interesting read concerning storytelling and the business world. The International Association of Business Communicators (IABC) surveyed 345 of its members to find out how business people use storytelling in their organizations to encourage employees. Since it is common for PowerPoint, newsletters and memos to be used for communicating information such as facts and statistics, storytelling may be incorporated to reach the intended audience.

Storytelling provides a way to share information in motivating ways. Stories bring forth emotions. They are less structured (unlike a bulleted list). They help listener’s connect through their prior experiences and make associations.

The largest obstacle found to using stories is lack of time to collect stories and resources from whom the stories may be derived.

The article was very interesting. It offered additional information as to how stories connect people and story strategies for the business world.

If we are teaching future children who will participate in the business community as adults, should we not also teach them the importance of storytelling? Allowing them to share true stories that are discovered through interviewing someone would be a good experience for students’ preparation and participation in good communication practices.

Reference:

Ioffreda, A., & Gargiulo, T. (2008). Who’s telling stories? Communication World, 25(1), 37-39.

Storytelling in the School Library

I think it is time that I revisit storytelling in the school library. Why? Storytelling has so much potential for reaching people. Yet, I stink at it unless I am telling a funny, rib-tickling story. Storytelling reaches across cultures. But, I only belong to one culture, really. However, storytelling helps people make connections between the storyteller’s tale and their own experiences. I am good at making connections!

School Library Web Sites

It’s that time again: Reviewing school library web sites.

Are school library web sites changing to meet the needs of their users? Over time, I have observed more interactive sites that are attractive. The process of change has been slow, yet steady.

Many of the cute clip art decorations have disappeared. Replacing it are actual photos of users in action within the local facilities of the school library.

Designated areas for research links, reference databases, school-related information, suggested reading, the online catalog, professional development or links for teachers, and miscellaneous are now regular features.

The virtual school library is coming alive. Students and parents have the opportunity to access school resources from outside the school walls to continue the learning experience.

What will be interesting is to watch for what is to come for school library web site content.

Using Diigo for Social Bookmarking

Diigo has been around for awhile. It is a useful social bookmarking tool that allows you to share websites with others who view your Diigo library. A simple toolbar that may be added to your browser allows you to bookmark any site that you are viewing. When adding bookmarks, you are able to designate tabs and select categories that you have created to which you want the website to belong. Also, at the time that you add the bookmark for the website, you are able to share the link and your tags with any group to which you are a member within the Diigo community.

Diigo community allows for groups to form for sharing bookmarks of a common interest. I belong to three different communities. Between the three communities, I receive on average about 2-3 websites per day. What others share through the communities helps educate me on the accessible websites that might help me with my teaching, student learning, professional development, collaboration, and more.

There is so much more to Diigo than what I have added here. Visit the site to learn about additional benefits to using this social bookmarking tool. Also, you may search my bookmarks for Diigo (http://www.diigo.com) to locate supplemental information.