Searching for Online Books

I love my Kindle, just as I love my paper-bound books. Now, I am beginning to find a great deal of usefulness for the wealth of online books that are available. They come in various categories.

  1. Books in the public domain, published prior to 1924.
  2. Books that carry a Creative Commons license and are usually created in open document format (ODF) and/or converted to PDF.

Books in the public domain may be scanned by volunteers or paid workers who contribute a library’s collections to the online environment. These books with the older publication date provide a rich view of what has gone before. Some might even be required reading for assignments, and they are available for free for everyone in the class at the same time of access!

Books that carry a Creative Commons license are added to the online environment so that their contents reach many more readers than a print copy would. Much of the time, readers may print the entire book or only portions for their personal use. As long as a reader has a computer and Internet access, these books are available for learning.

Various ways to access both types of books are available. Probably the most well-known is Google Books. At Google Books, one may read reviews, view content (sometimes limited), view sellers of the book, and more. Using the Overview link, a reader is able to see what is available online concerning that particular book. Professional reviews as well as contributing reviews are helpful in the decision for reading the book. Common terms and phrases are included in a text cloud that helps to define the material contained within its contents. Surprisingly, a map is included to label the places that are mentioned in the book.

Personally, I am considering all of the possibilities for use when students read a book.

For Microsoft users, the Live Book Search has been canceled. An explanation may be found here.

Online services that require a fee are available for online books that may not fit into either of the categories I listed. The text of these e-books may indeed be under copyright at the time of access.

Some of the providers of e-books include:

SkillSoft’s Books24x7 – one of the more expensive services where you are able to download chapters (if  you are a corporate customer) in PDF. Most of the books are business, authoritative titles.

Questia – a much more affordable subscription-based service with e-books that cover a wide range of topics. I was an early adopter of Questia and found it a wonderful way to read and take notes on my reading. By clicking on the Education link, you are able to view all of the books included in the e-library on that topic.

ebrary – a service that requests a small registration fee to get you started. Then, when you find something you want to print/download, you pay per page.

Open Content Alliance (OCA) at the Internet Archives – this is the jackpot of e-books! Many contributed collections may be accessed from here.

Open Library – an online catalog for accessing all types of books, where you may select to buy, borrow, or browse.

The Global Text Project – provides you with three types of content: e-content, books that have been scanned, and links to online books that may be of interest.

Using Storytelling with Students as the Tellers

The first reaction that I receive from teachers when I talk to them about storytelling is that they think of themselves as the storyteller or students retelling a story that is memorized. What if the stories told are by the students only and these stories are their stories? I am sure we can easily imagine our time with our students running rampant with stories that engage other students, but not necessarily how we desire for everyone to interact.

It would be much better is we set the stage by utilizing these ideas:

  • Stories relate to a sense of community. Since our students belong to the class community, they build relationships with each other. There is also a culture that exists in this community that reflects the students.
  • We can use stories to talk about life experience. Students have stories that come from the events of their lives. They are natural born storytellers, especially if given the opportunity to share what they know. When they retell their stories, they may discover new insights or possibilities.
  • If we want to use storytelling with students, we must set the parameters for the best possible outcomes for learning.  To begin we must be clear about what is expected of them as they explore a topic and find their relational stories. Asking a question that sets the tone and acts as a prompt is an excellent way to do this.
  • Reminding them how to listen to others as they listen to stories is important as well. They should not interrupt the storyteller. Also, they should not think about their story while listening to someone’s story. Finally, they should try to think of a title that they would like to give to the person’s story that they are listening to. Active listening is engagement and helps to maintain community and adds to the culture of the group.
  • Ask yourself, how much time do you have to devote or allow for the storytelling process to occur during your lesson. Should you break students up into large or small groups? Should students work with only a partner? Do you want students to share a few stories with all of the students when you come back together? If so, how will you determine which stories are told. Remember that adults are able to listen to about 4-5 stories in a row. For children, the number will be less.
  • Ideally, the storytelling will help students to process what they know. Schedule time for students to talk about the stories they hear. The conversations will help solidify the theme that is being examined. New learning will become more apparent through the discussion making it easier for students to identify what they are studying.
  • Selecting topics for storytelling are best chosen when they represent successes or joy. The goal here is to encourage students to think about what we want them to focus on. If sad or depressing stories are the focus, we may offer opportunities for students to not experience success.
  • Storytelling works well with topics that require the building of knowledge. When students engage in telling stories that lead to them seeing how the puzzle pieces fit together, an excitement of understanding may break out. Synergy can be created leading to better understanding of the topic.

When storytelling is combined with students who are telling about what they know and the topic that we are attempting to help students understand, the resulting stories may enrich the learning and the community to which the students belong. A larger view of the world is embraced. Relationships grow. Storytelling may be the key to success for some topics that we teach where we have not experienced that success before with students.

Vlogs

This particular vlog by Howard Rheingold http://vlog.rheingold.com/ contains an entry on vernacular that really set the pace for why I will want to add professional vlogs to my “reading” list. With time limited as to how much I can actually spend on professional development, I must select carefully the materials that I am willing to devote my energies to for growth. Even though I am considering this vlog as part of my growth plan, I must not give up print. I have found that print materials, especially scholarly journals, add a richness and thickness to my personal development that other types of materials do not.